AIM Archives - Year: 2019

If you start selling your new B2B product when you launch it, you’ve started too late.

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Research shows top sales professionals ask customers questions such as, “What problems are you facing?” Why not ask this before you develop a new product —not just afterwards? Such questions engage, so customers are often “half-sold” by your launch date. And their answers let you create much better new products. So… one question, two benefits.

More in Leader’s Guide Videos Lesson 17, Engage your B2B customers

An important question is, “How’s that been working for you?”

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Your market is growing at 3% and your operating plan says you’ll grow faster than this next year. Of course, your competitors have similar plans… meaning everyone plans to grow faster than the market served. As TV psychologist Dr. Phil would say, “How’s that been working for you?” Could it be time for a different approach… e.g. understanding customer needs far better than competitors?

More in Leader’s Guide Videos Lesson 1, Recognize your growth challenge

Engage your B2B customers

B2C suppliers use customer interviews to gain insight. B2B suppliers should do this AND to build customer engagement. If your B2B market has a handful of large buyers, use your interviews to impress them as the supplier they should do business with. Three practical ways to do this are explored here.

More in ebook, Reinventing VOC for B2B

Avoid the 4 Traps of Technology Prediction

Avoid the 4 traps of technology prediction using jobs-to-be-done (JTBD) thinking that is informed by the voice of the customer. Image of a large door open to the future.

What changes will future technology waves bring?  Will we ride them to riches or drown under the weight of disruption? A Danish proverb warns that “Prediction is dangerous, especially about the future.” A cycle of bad logic Unfortunately, when we theorize, we can become more and more attached to our predictions. A cycle of bad ... Read More

Stockholder and employee interests only conflict in the short term.

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In the long-term stockholder and employee interests align. This is also true of customer and community interests. In the long-term, it’s in the best interests of everyone—except your competitors—for your business to develop high-value products, sustain strong growth, provide stable employment, and increase market capitalization. Given this alignment, doesn’t it seem odd that many business leaders seem so fixated on the near-term?

More in e-book, Leader’s Guide to B2B Organic Growth (Lesson 30)