Blog Category: Organic Growth

Why are you sprinting… when you’re in a marathon?

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If you expect your business to be around in 10 years, why are you focusing so much of your energy on this quarter? Especially since less than 10% of your company’s stock value comes from current earnings… while the rest comes from the market’s expectations of your future earnings. Sure, this is what most leaders focus on… but not leaders like Jeff Bezos or Steve Jobs.

More in article, The Inputs to Innovation for B2B

The first rule of business: Leave yours stronger than you found it

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I think this rule should be on every business leader’s desk, and perhaps stamped on their paychecks. Should we be impressed if they pumped up the stock price during their tenure? Not if they did it by mortgaging the company’s future with short-term moves, perhaps chasing away top talent in the process. Glory lies in building something of lasting significance… not in pillaging it.

More in article, How to become a great business leader

Short-term financial focus leads to roadkill

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When you drive at night with just your low-beam lights on, you may observe small animals as you run over them. But you can’t avoid them. To do that, you need to have your high-beams on. Same with all those short-term financial reviews: You can only observe the bad results. To change the results, you’d need to build growth capabilities for the future. Run your business with your high-beams on.

More in e-book, Leader’s Guide to B2B Organic Growth (Lesson 7)

Business Case Excellence: The 12 Key Components

Consider these 12 sections of a winning business case… for B2B product development teams finishing the front end of innovation before the development stage.

We’ll examine 12 parts of a B2B business case format used by more than a thousand new-product teams. Our research will show you which sections are the most critical… including the part teams bungle most often. Do 12 parts seem like too many? We’ll close with a sensible business case “short-cut,” the 6-part market case. This ... Read More

An important question is, “How’s that been working for you?”

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Your market is growing at 3% and your operating plan says you’ll grow faster than this next year. Of course, your competitors have similar plans… meaning everyone plans to grow faster than the market served. As TV psychologist Dr. Phil would say, “How’s that been working for you?” Could it be time for a different approach… e.g. understanding customer needs far better than competitors?

More in Leader’s Guide Videos Lesson 1, Recognize your growth challenge

Stockholder and employee interests only conflict in the short term.

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In the long-term stockholder and employee interests align. This is also true of customer and community interests. In the long-term, it’s in the best interests of everyone—except your competitors—for your business to develop high-value products, sustain strong growth, provide stable employment, and increase market capitalization. Given this alignment, doesn’t it seem odd that many business leaders seem so fixated on the near-term?

More in e-book, Leader’s Guide to B2B Organic Growth (Lesson 30)

B2B Organic Growth: 8 top lessons for leaders

B2B Organic growth is driven by leadership

We call our bosses “leaders” out of respect for their organizational position. But do they drive B2B organic growth? How many would pass this one-question pop quiz: What is the foremost duty of a business leader? What’s your answer? I believe the correct answer is: Leave your business stronger than you found it. Some might ... Read More

The growth you earned may be less than you think.

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“Market Growth” is the tide that lifts all boats… your reward for being just average. “Inherited Growth” comes from great products developed long ago. These are the gifts that keep giving… until they don’t (when you’ve been commoditized). The only one you control is “Earned Growth,” when you understand and meet customer needs better than anyone else.

More in article, Better get used to mediocre growth